Q&A: How many people were arrested in “Occupy Wall Street” protests?

Question by Itachi E: How many people were arrested in “Occupy Wall Street” protests?
What is the approximate number of people (or the exact if possible) who were arrested in the recent “Occupy Wall Street” protests?

Best answer:

Answer by Hippie ? Chick ???? §?? Î????
http://occupywallst.org/

This keeps you updated, and it lists on many arrests on a daily basis.

Know better? Leave your own answer in the comments!


How many people were arrested in “Occupy Wall Street” protests?

Question by Itachi E: How many people were arrested in “Occupy Wall Street” protests?
What is the approximate number of people (or the exact if possible) who were arrested in the recent “Occupy Wall Street” protests?

Best answer:

Answer by Hippie ? Chick ???? §?? Î????
http://occupywallst.org/

This keeps you updated, and it lists on many arrests on a daily basis.

What do you think? Answer below!


Peter Schiff Speaks for 1 Percent at Occupy Wall Street

Peter Schiff Speaks for 1 Percent at Occupy Wall Street

Last week, Reason.tv followed investment guru, radio show host, and unflappable defender of capitalism Peter Schiff as he spent three hours among the Occupy Wall Street protesters in Manhattan’s Zuccotti Park. An unapologetic member of “the 1 Percent,” Schiff argued with all comers for the better part of an afternoon. Schiff is no ordinary observer. As the prinicipal of the financial firm Euro Pacific Capital, he’s a full-fledged and unapologetic member of “the 1 Percent.” As an outspoken radio show host and commentator, he not only predicted the housing crash and financial crisis, he railed bank and auto-sector bailouts as they were happening. Schiff believes that capitalism offers is the only hope for young, frustrated people to have a vibrant and prosperous future. So he went to Occupy Wall Street to engage and debate the protesters. Touring the Occupy Wall Street scene in New York with a sign that read “I Am the 1%, Let’s Talk,” Schiff spent more than three hours on the scene, explaining the difference between cronyism and capitalism, bailouts and balance sheets, and more. “The regulation we want is the market,” said Schiff. “That’s what works.” Schiff describes himself as “sympathetic” to the plight of the OWS protesters, but thinks their anger is misdirected at legitimate business interests and should be better at the White House, Congress, the Federal Reserve, and the crony capitalists they’ve bailed out. Check out Schiff’s Euro Pacific Capital at www.europac.net
Video Rating: 4 / 5

Associate Editor of Reason Magazine Peter Suderman appeared on Freedom Watch with Judge Napolitano to discuss notable political events of 2011 on this special, year-end episode. Topics included the debt ceiling debate, the non-recovery of the economy, Occupy Wall Street, the Tea Party, Fast and Furious, Anthony Weiner, Solyndra, the multiple US wars and assassinations, and more. Air date: 12/20/11. Run time approximately 36 minutes. Visit www.reason.tv for HD, iPod and audio versions of this video and subscribe to Reason.tv’s Youtube channel to receive automatic notification when new material goes live.
Video Rating: 4 / 5


Occupy Wall Street

A few nice wall street images I found:

Occupy Wall Street

Image by skinnylawyer
The "Occupy Wall Street" protest began on 17 September 2011 at Zuccotti Park in Lower Manhattan, near Wall Street, which the protesters renamed as "Liberty Square."

Many people throughout the US and beyond have been upset by an economic system that benefits the powers that be, especially in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis, the massive taxpayer-funded bank bailouts, and continued difficulties for everyday people.

The Tea Party had been the initial populist uprising, upset with the Obama Administration’s "attacks on the US Constitution," but as it became clearer that the Tea Party was more of an Astroturf organization funded by the big bankers themselves to further weaken common sense rules and further consolidate wealth into the few, it built up a very negative image after the initial upswell.

Occupy Wall Street and its sister protests come generally from the other side of the political spectrum. Participants may be mainstream center-left to anarchists to far-leftists. Although they don’t always have common goals, I support their right to voice their frustrations and ask for solutions that benefit the people and the economy as a whole, rather than the most powerful.

Occupy Wall Street had been inspired by the peaceful people-led overthrows of Middle Eastern dictatorships. Their right to protest is largely based on the First Amendment to the United States Constitution that guarantees freedom of speech, assembly, and grievances. The large media outlets at first ignored the protests, then various entities (including New York City’s mayor and police department) tried to crack down on the Occupy protests, but each crackdown has only added more legitimacy to the protests. Now the key is not to merely squat in public areas, but to proactively push for concrete changes, through voting and discussions, so that jobs can be created and the American workers can go back to work.

The sign alluding to credit unions is a hint for the "Move Your Money Day," November 5th, when people were asked to move their bank accounts from the large "too big to fail" banks to smaller banks and credit unions. Credit unions throughout the US reported that they gained more members and deposits in the month leading up to that day, than they had in all of 2010.

Occupy Wall Street

Image by skinnylawyer
The "Occupy Wall Street" protest began on 17 September 2011 at Zuccotti Park in Lower Manhattan, near Wall Street, which the protesters renamed as "Liberty Square."

Many people throughout the US and beyond have been upset by an economic system that benefits the powers that be, especially in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis, the massive taxpayer-funded bank bailouts, and continued difficulties for everyday people.

The Tea Party had been the initial populist uprising, upset with the Obama Administration’s "attacks on the US Constitution," but as it became clearer that the Tea Party was more of an Astroturf organization funded by the big bankers themselves to further weaken common sense rules and further consolidate wealth into the few, it built up a very negative image after the initial upswell.

Occupy Wall Street and its sister protests come generally from the other side of the political spectrum. Participants may be mainstream center-left to anarchists to far-leftists. Although they don’t always have common goals, I support their right to voice their frustrations and ask for solutions that benefit the people and the economy as a whole, rather than the most powerful.

Occupy Wall Street had been inspired by the peaceful people-led overthrows of Middle Eastern dictatorships. Their right to protest is largely based on the First Amendment to the United States Constitution that guarantees freedom of speech, assembly, and grievances. The large media outlets at first ignored the protests, then various entities (including New York City’s mayor and police department) tried to crack down on the Occupy protests, but each crackdown has only added more legitimacy to the protests. Now the key is not to merely squat in public areas, but to proactively push for concrete changes, through voting and discussions, so that jobs can be created and the American workers can go back to work.

This man’s sign alludes to the US healthcare system’s focus on profits rather than coverage. It is too easy to be turned away for a bogus "pre-existing condition," to lose coverage for catastrophic illness, and/or to see steep hikes in insurance premiums. At least 15% of the US population lacks health insurance for one reason or another, and even more people have inadequate insurance. The Affordable Care Act, passed by the Obama Administration, addresses the worst of the abuses and gives a path for almost all Americans to obtain health insurance, but the far left is still upset that it did not include a public option (the insurance will still be provided by the private insurers), while the far right calls it a government takeover of healthcare, to be repealed at any cost, referring to the Act by the pejorative nickname ObamaCare.